WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — As the late spring rains continue, much of Indiana still remains unplanted, with only 22% of the total corn crop and 14% of the total soybean crop planted.

Bob Nielsen, a Purdue University professor of agronomy, said the soil continues to be aggregated and it remains to wet to plant as rainfall events continue.

“The few acres that have been planted will see varying risk damage from frequent rain events, ponding on the surface and flooding,” he said.

Nielsen said the acres that already were planted during breaks in the rain could see damage ranging from total stand loss to not much damage at all depending on soil drainage and compaction issues in the field.

“Time is marching on. Folks in the northern third of the state have a bigger decision to make in that area,” he said, adding in that part of the state there is a shorter growing season, especially for corn.

Nielsen said those producers need to consider switching to shorter season hybrids if they haven’t already.

“The central third and southern third of the state have a longer growing season,” he said.

Nielsen said as producers sit around and wait for fields to dry out, they need to consider having a talk with their seed dealers about switching maturities, as well as talking with their crop insurance agents.

Ashley Langreck can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 192, or alangreck@agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Langreck.

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