We were able to cross corn silage chopping off the list for harvest 2019 at Meier Grain and Livestock Farms this week. Feels good to have that project done and to have moved into the combine. We even took a couple loads of soybeans off Sunday evening after chopping and a quick trip to get apple cider and donuts from a couple of nearby orchards.

I made a nice roundtrip across back roads and saw a lot of soybeans being harvested on Sunday afternoon along with a lot of bean fields that were now barren. This week was one of definite progress in Northern Illinois. I’ve heard of a few people that are done with beans and moving on to corn when it dries back out. Rain and wind hit the region this morning, about 0.275” and an Asian beetle is what I dumped out of our gauge. I saw one field that was worked and seeded back down. I would guess wheat, but it could be cover crop. There is rain forecast a number of days this week, but they are slight chances and small predicted totals.

I had lunch with a friend in ag from the Mendota today. It was nice to catch up and get input on what he is seeing in his area and in his travels. Reports of corn yields his way are down in the 160- to 180-bushel range, and moistures are in excess of 24%. We were happy with our silage appraisals of our corn planted June 2 and June 22, to be in the 195 to 202 range. Other reports closer to the state line have been in the 170 to 220 range. I didn’t get enough soybeans off here and the combine wasn’t calibrated to get a good feel for yield. But reports from friends have been that their bean yields are down from a typical year, but they are pleased with what they have considering the growing conditions we have had this year.

While driving the chopper pulling a wagon to the field, I was passed in a clearly marked no-passing zone by a pickup truck with firemen’s plates. Thank goodness no one was coming from the other way. In the chopper headed home after dark, I had to back up and find a place to get completely off the road because I met a combine with the bean platform attached. What irked me the most was their pickup truck was in the field with the head cart and the combine operator wasn’t alone. There was a grain cart operator there, too. There is no excuse to not take the time to be safe. They could have removed the head and carted it to the next field. If we expect patience and respect on the road, then we need to be doing it right, as well. Check to be sure lights are working, SMV is visible and up to date and take extra time to do it right, so we don’t add to the number of accidents or loss of life on the roadways during harvest.

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