We have corn in the ground. It’s a good feeling to report we are approximately 35% planted when I parked the planter tonight. We started the week spraying to get ahead of weed pressure and to burn down cover crops before planting. Started planting Wednesday evening around 6 p.m., and by the time the first wave of rains hit Thursday morning, we had about 240 acres in the ground and I even was able to catch a couple hours of sleep in there, too. I will admit I am extremely thankful for the ability to push speed and keep accuracy with the Exact Emerge planter we acquired last year.

We planted about 30 acres on Saturday before another round of rain passed, chasing me out of the field with only two rounds left. We had a little under 0.1” Saturday morning. Others across the region weren’t as lucky. I had reports from friends in the 0.75” to 0.9” range for Saturday. I was able to get out and finish those couple rounds and even snuck in a bonus little 2.3-acre patch before the Sunday wave of rain passed though. Once again, we were lucky and received less than 0.1” but others received 0.8” to 1.2” across the area.

The rest of the day yesterday was sunny and breezy. The only thing missing was the warmth we need. I was able to return to the field with the planter once again today. There’s a chance of rain overnight, but I’m hoping we miss it and can get a plot field planted and cover a few more high ground, dry acres. We really do need to miss some of these rains because we have about a third of our intended corn acres in the river bottoms we haven’t even been able to get into for strip tilling the NH3 on in preparation for planting.

I follow farmers in Canada to South Texas, East Coast to West Coast and even some in Europe, South America, Australia and Africa on Twitter. It’s an interesting snapshot of agriculture globally. The high number of photos of stuck tractors, planters, sprayers and a few stuck combines in Argentina that have been in my timeline lately lets me know we are not alone. This issue of too much rain is widespread. The past two days included photos of snow in Colorado and Nebraska. With only 49% of the corn crop in nationwide and a wet 10-day forecast in the Corn Belt, it will be interesting watching what the market does.

Received our first call to schedule custom rye chopping when we get a window for them to cut and have it chopped without being rained on. At least the rain has been good for some crops. Alfalfa, rye and wheat all are growing and looking pretty good. If we could get some warmth, it would really be growing. Here’s hoping that 10-day forecast is wrong. Be patient and be safe when you are able to get out there.

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