Tuesday, I opened up the last Behlen round crib of ear corn. The first 300 bushels always come out without much effort. The heat and humidity increased significantly as I continued to load out more wagon loads of ear corn. Dad reminded me couple hours later that his uncle, Robert, died shoveling ear corn many years ago before my time in similar heat indexes to that day, so we stopped.

Rain was forecasted for the next evening, so I decided to cultivate some of the wide row corn with my JD RG4 cultivator. I left one field untouched to compare cultivating versus not disturbing the soil between the rows. I need to find a narrow row cultivator over the next year as I believe it’s needed from time to time. Falling asleep cultivating is something we’ve all done whether you wish to admit it or not — just remember it’s best to stop and lift out rather than whipping the wheel.

Wednesday prior to the rain, I helped plant soybeans and got the opportunity to drive a friend’s Cockshutt 570 Super with a drill. By Thursday morning, I was receiving reports from friends of heavy rainfall less than five miles away with Circle Y Farms of Plymouth with 4 inches of rainfall and Kendall Koontz of Bremen with less than an inch. We had just shy of 2 inches, but still had water ponding near tile risers. The Heston ditch rised quickly, but only from the water south of us. I spent better part of Thursday shoveling dirt from between rows so surface water could drain off quickly into risers before the sun cooked the corn and soybeans. For those that haven’t given up on planting this spring, some farmers are planting soybeans by plane.

I enjoyed my visit to Pinney Purdue Agricultural Center Farm in Wanatah. We had excellent weather and such a great gathering of area farmers, Purdue Extension educators and staff to help celebrate the 100th birthday of this research farm. Bob Nielsen gave us a history lesson on how corn has progressed from the mid-1800s to today, and Shaun Casteel did a great job explaining soybeans. Fred Whitford was the main speaker prior to the meal. He did a great job including the audience in his research of agriculture and how farming practices from early 1900s until now have changed. I’d like to thank everyone that came up and said hi. I appreciate the compliments on my weekly report from the fields. I find it interesting to hear from each and everyone of you to see what towns you are from.

Dad and I finished up measuring fields Sunday afternoon, so I can get fields certified for FSA with the drag chain and stakes. Late Sunday afternoon, two tornadoes started forming west of LaPaz and Lakeville. We watched them head northeast of us. They touched down within a mile of St. Joseph County fairgrounds, destroying businesses near Ironwood and Ireland roads.

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