My brother and I took one evening and sprayed 25 gallons of paint on our bank barn, corn crib and granary. The availability of our telehandler and a sprayer makes painting a breeze, compared to the way we used to do it: wood extension ladder with a two-gallon bucket and 4-inch brush. In order to appreciate it, we had to earn it first and do it the hard way. Hopefully, TSC gets more barn and fence paint in soon so we can finish the rest of them. It’s amazing how one layer of white paint can brighten the buildings up and make them look stronger.

We spent this past week fastening steel to an old granary for Mr. and Mrs. John Sahlhoff of Bremen. Sometimes old buildings can be a challenge as they tend to lean one way or another, but restoring them is rewarding.

By midweek, area farmers were cutting soybeans, with moisture a ranging from 12 percent to 14 percent. A few miles away, Ken Carbeiner of Wyatt was shelling corn that was 22 percent moisture. I finished mowing fifth-cutting hay on Saturday, then attended Northern Indiana Historical Power Show in Valparaiso.

I received a call from Pat Hardy and her son, Mark, earlier this week. They had three husking wagons which they were considering selling, and wanted to see them at the contest on Oct. 7. It’s always enjoyable reconnecting with past huskers and sharing memories.

Record temps continued to soar and mature crops with temps in the 90s, and AccuWeather reported “real feel” temps of 100 to 105. We did receive two- to four-tenths of an inch of rain earlier this week before the heat kicked up.

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