Hello from Greene County. This is my last post of the year. 2018 has been a year of successes and challenges, much like other years on the farm. Corn and soybean yields were good on average. Basis took an unexpected turn wider in September, and I’m still trying to manage our way out of that as I write. Other than that day I hit a tile hole and the back axle broke lose on the combine, we had a rather uneventful harvest.

As for the hay business, I expect prices to be steady to higher through next year. Locally, it feels like inventories are still low. Many of our customers filled up their barns this summer to avoid running out of hay this winter. Six to 8 inches of snow in mid-November started off hay feeding season with a bang, and I have a feeling that we might be in for a long winter. I expect we will run out of hay by March. We ship 32 large round bales, or 22 tons, of reed canary grass by semi load. If you want to talk about hay, please call me at 217-491-4254.

I expect our cattle business to remain the same in the short term. Right now, we have two pens of 700- to 800-pound feeders and just received some 500-pound feeders. At higher weights, we ship them to Kansas and retain ownership until it’s time to sell to Kansas buyers.

I hope you enjoyed reading about our adventures on our diversified farm in Greene County. Merry Christmas.

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