My local supermarket is so crowded with multiple choices of many products that they now set some displays in the middle of the aisle. There is barely room for the shopping cart to get down the aisle. Apparently, the consumers are demanding this many different choices. I am just a simple meat and potatoes customer, so I find this hard to understand.

This must be the reason that some people want to try meatless meat. I am wondering if they realize that those “meets” — I will use that spelling since those products are not meat or beef — may not fulfill their nutrient needs, or may even contain ingredients that are not that good. They fall far short of matching the flavor of beef and may not come close to being the nutrient rich package in beef. The ZIP of beef — zinc, iron and protein in a three- or four-ounce serving — is hard to beat. Can you name a “fake” product that is as good as the genuine one? The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association is working hard to assure that any meatless “meet” cannot be labeled beef. Hope they are successful.

I just returned from the fall Ag Roundtable at WRAM Radio in Monmouth and sponsored, in part, by FS. Vanessa Wetterling is a great moderator and was joined by DeLoss Jahnke and Mike Adams. Those sessions are always fun to participate in and seem worthwhile for listeners. Much of the discussion centered on the declined ag economy stemming from trade and weather problems. I was able to talk about “fake meet” and the importance of premises identification with the Illinois Department of Agriculture. Please register your premises if you have livestock and help assure that we have a better chance of controlling any disease outbreak.

Our grazing is really going very well right now with a nice 2-inch rain to spur our forage along. The steers look as though they are doing something and have provided us with a better look than earlier in the summer. The scales will eventually tell the tale of success or failure. We are in the stockpile season with our fescue paddocks. We had to clip some of them due to the influx of foxtail. I never have seen it this bad. Another quirk of 2019.

Last week, I presented on management intensive rotational grazing to the Warren County Soil and Water District. An attentive audience with good questions made for a good evening. Someday, I hope to visit their pastures along U.S. 34 where they have used an Environmental Quality Incentives Program project to upgrade property.

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