Well, my luck is holding up sort of. Saturday, I had the whole flock sheared, and on Sunday, I ended up with an all-day rain that equaled 0.4 inches with a little snow mixed in, 10 to 20 mph wind and a high temperature of 36 degrees. To the north of me 30 miles or west of me 10 miles, they had snow up to 4 inches deep with higher wind speeds.

My naked sheep were cold and wet, but they had a shelter to protect them, and they survived. I’m going to start to feed the whole herd soy hull pellets to increase their body condition leading up to lambing in mid-May. I think they are too skinny for the number of lambs they are carrying, estimated at a 200% average lamb crop.

Talking about lambing, I had my first lamb born April 12, oops. The rest are due the middle of May. Rick Adams had four lambs born to one ewe on April 12 also, and he has that on Facebook. That was his first one born, but it was due then.

With the grass greening up and the cereal rye growing, I’d sure like to go to the cornstalk field and graze it, but I don’t know when it will be dry enough to hold the sheep up. Just about the time it dries up, I get another rain. But I’ve got a couple of ideas I’m going to try, and I still have some leftover pasture from last fall to graze. Hopefully, the permanent grass pastures will have a firmer sod base to hold up the sheep. Things are going to start to get busy, but I don’t think we will get the crops in the ground early this year.

Enjoy the nice spring weather, flowers and the chirping birds before we start acting like chickens with our heads cut off.

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