Well, I think everyone around Bloomington has their crops in, finally. The weatherman calls for today and tomorrow to be dry and then four more days of rain. My lambing is pretty well done. The annual forage field is not very dense, but it is feeding the flock.

I did get some baleage made right in between rain storms. We cut it at 10 a.m. and baled it by noon, and we had a moisture tester that read 47% moisture in the bale. I was very hesitant to bale and wrap is so soon, but at 47% moisture, I said bale it. The forage was chest-high grasses that were headed out with some clover in it. These are individually wrapped bales. This is the first time I’ve done this, so I’ll know more when I feed it this winter. I did get a lot of bales per acre, though.

I did have a nice visit the first week of June from an Australian veterinarian, Dr. Holly Ludeman, and her dad, Peter. They are spending a month in the states visiting farms and ranches. Holly is heavily involved in animal welfare in Australia and has started an industry-centered website that is centered on education and information revolving around animal welfare, transportation and production. She is instrumental in the export of live cattle and sheep to markets in the Pacific Rim and the Middle East.

She has two websites: thesheepcollective.com.au or, for cattle, thecattlecollective.com.au. Her business card reads: “We are a collection of farmers, truck drivers, vets and industry representatives. We care about Australia’s livestock sector and advancing animal welfare.” Holly and her dad were very down to earth, and they are on our side. Visit the website. It is very good — she showed me a video of loading 70,000 head of sheep onto a ship and their voyage across the water to Saudi Arabia!

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