Hello from Graze-N-Grow. We were blessed again with an inch and a half of rain last Thursday night. Our cover crops are growing great on the wheat stubble, and I had a highboy blow rye and turnips on the corn the last day of August. It’s amazing how that germinated even before any rain, and now it’s got a good start. It will be several weeks before harvest on that June planting, but should be great grazing after that. The sheep and cattle have had good grazing after our July dry spell. It’s always nice to walk through the pastures when they are green and growing. That’s not always the case this time of year, but welcomed now.

Last year about now we picked up two pups from Bruce Shanks in Missouri and the female had six pups on Sept. 2. Both mom and dad are Anatolian/Pyrenees cross and dad is my best guard dog, so I have high hopes for these newcomers. I won’t need them all, so if any of you need one, let me know. There will be pictures posted on our website soon at graze-n-growfarm.com. The hard part of raising guard dog pups is not getting them bonded to people more than sheep since everyone thinks they’re so cute they can’t resist holding them. I’ll probably have to restrict visiting hours.

I enjoyed a great time on a pasture walk hosted by Pasture Project at the Greg Rebman farm near Frederick with Dr. Allen Williams last month. He is a great grazing advocate and along with David Kleinschmidt led a good soil health discussion. I only wish this knowledge had been promoted more when I started farming, but I’m glad it’s being made available to so many now. The future of our farm’s productivity depends on these soil health principles, so if any of you hear of these demonstrations near you, it would be well worth your time.

Although harvest is a long way off for me, I’m sure many of you will be starting before this month is gone so be safe and take a rest once in a while. Be safe! Happy trails.

0
0
0
0
0

Load comments