Nick Carter, co-founder of Husk Foods, recently gave group tours of the Husk processing facility in Greenfield, Ind. The regional food system helps preserve local Indiana corn, green beans and peas so that it can be sold year-round. Carter founded the business with Adam Moody and Chris Baggott.
Nick Carter, co-founder of Husk Foods, recently gave group tours of the Husk processing facility in Greenfield, Ind. The regional food system helps preserve local Indiana corn, green beans and peas so that it can be sold year-round. Carter founded the business with Adam Moody and Chris Baggott.
GREENFIELD, Ind. — Although the push to support and buy local food has increased, something was missing.

Co-founders of the Husk processing facility discovered the missing puzzle piece was preservation.

One year after freezing its first ear of Indiana sweet corn in its Greenfield farm-to-freezer food processing facility, Husk now sells corn, green beans and peas year-round across the Midwest.

“It’s truly been an entrepreneurial venture from the start,” said Nick Carter, Husk co-founder.

Carter, who shared a mutual interest in locally processed food, co-founded the company with Adam Moody, Moody’s Butcher Shop owner and fifth-generation farmer, and Chris Baggott, software entrepreneur turned sustainable farmer in 2010 with Tyner Pond

Carter can remember building a prototype of the plant in April 2013, signing the lease in June and shucking the first ear of corn on July 1.

The processing facility that is just less than 5,000 square feet has cutting machines, freezers and specialty equipment. The facility processes in two months the inventory for an entire year.

Husk partners with local Indiana farmers to provide the food that is then processed in the facility.

As a way to show consumers the food is local, a code on the back of each Husk product tells the exact farmer the product came from so that consumers can contact the farmers if interested.

“Local food supports local economy and local jobs, it’s sustainable and lets you know where your food comes from,” Carter said.

So what makes the products different?

Carter said the answer is simple. They boil the corn, blanch it, directly on the cob. The corn is then bagged in those juices and frozen, which makes a difference in flavor.

The business also is one of a kind — a regional system that preserves local food.

Husk processing plant also is different from bigger companies because the processing plant does it all versus, for example, having separate facilities for corn, green beans and peas, Carter said.

The plant also has the ability to both blanch and freeze the products in the same facility.

“We do things that are more expensive and more difficult, but, man, it tastes good,” Carter said.

For more information about the business or a map of locations that sell the Husk products, including independent retailers, Marsh Supermarkets, Kroger and others, visit huskfoods.com.