DECATUR, Ill. — Thanks to phenomenal weather for the 2014 growing season, Illinois farmers may harvest one of the best crops ever. However, there will be many risks they will need to manage.

Speakers at the Harvest 2014 conference on Aug. 21 at Decatur’s Progress City USA will address many of those issues, including a maximum of 14.5 percent moisture for corn, supply challenges for propane needed for grain drying and what to do with corn that has genetic traits unapproved by some global buyers.

The conference will begin with a combine clinic, designed to help farmers increase their harvest efficiency. And before going to the field, bins, fans and grain dryers have to be prepped, and farmers will get a checklist for issues to manage.

Once in the bin, grain drying and conditioning are important to preserve quality, and speakers will recommend moisture control strategies. Attendees also will find out if propane, which was in short supply last winter and spring, will be in sufficient supply to dry a large crop in a timely manner.

But with corn and soybean prices lower than they have been for more than four years, a market outlook will be one of the hot topics of the conference.

With China’s refusal to accept corn or distillers grains with either Syngenta’s MIR 162 trait or from its Duracade hybrids, popular for corn rootworm control, farmers who have those hybrids may find delivery restrictions at their elevators. Marketing alternatives will be discussed.

And farmers who find the unwelcome Palmer amaranth growing in front of their combine will want to hear the latest recommendations from university research on how to avoid major headaches in 2015 and beyond.

Harvest 2014 will begin at 9 a.m. and conclude by 4 p.m. in the Morton Building at Progress City USA, where lunch will be served. Registration, coffee and a trade show will begin at 8 a.m.

Pre-registration by Aug. 15 is encouraged by registering at www.harvest-2014.com.

The early-bird $85 fee includes registration, lunch, breaks and materials. All farm owners, operators and other agribusiness interests are welcome. The conference is being presented by AgEngage.