A worker in the quality assurance section of Equipment Technologies checks out the cab of a sprayer. The company makes five different models of Apache sprayers that vary by tank size. The sprayers are manufactured in Indiana.
A worker in the quality assurance section of Equipment Technologies checks out the cab of a sprayer. The company makes five different models of Apache sprayers that vary by tank size. The sprayers are manufactured in Indiana.
MOORESVILLE, Ind. — An Indiana company manufactures sprayers that are used on farms across the world.

Equipment Technologies, maker of Apache sprayers, has a 168,000-square-foot headquarters in Mooresville.

“We don’t make all the parts, but we assemble them here,” said Steve Leer, Apache spokesman. “We buy many of the parts from Indiana companies. The booms come from Lafayette; the yellow handles come from Crawfordsville.”

The company opened its doors in Indianapolis in 1997. Three years later it moved southwest to Mooresville.

As sprayer demand increased the factory began busting at the seams. An additional building was added to accommodate the growing company.

“A big part of our business is spare parts and taking care of the machinery, so we needed a warehouse,” Leer said. “We also do a lot of training on how to drive it, run it and to train dealers. We bring them here for training.”

There are five models of Apache sprayers. They vary to suit farms with unique needs.

A small farmer may want a 750-gallon tank with an 80-foot boom, said Jeremy Hurt, senior application manager.

A farmer with a large operation may want a 1,200-gallon tank with a 132-foot boom.

“The Apache idea from the start was to have mechanical drive,” Hurt said. “It’s a rugged, reliable, simple model. A farmer or dealer can easily work on it.

“The machine has changed. It’s bigger and has more horsepower, after listening to our customer’s needs. We’re making it easier for farmers to operate these machines and do a better job spraying.”

Self-propelled sprayers such as the Apache are faster and more efficient than other models, Hurt said.

Because Apache is lightweight, there’s less soil compaction, as well.

The 2015 line of sprayers launched this summer featured a re-designed cab. The focus was on comfort, including automatic climate control and ergonomic seats.

The 2016 model will be built to meet new emission standards.

“We had a recent customer survey about what people like about Apache,” Leer said. “There were two things that stood out. The simplicity of the construction and the lightweight. The lighter the machine, the less compaction.”

Learn more at www.etsprayers.com.