Brian Rieck, product manager for Automated Production Systems, shows the company’s Agri-Alert 128 Touch Alarm System. The new one-touch zoom, one-touch filtering alarm system allows producers to check any problem areas at a glance from their computers or smart phones. The alarm system was one of the new swine system products that AP displayed at the 2014 World Pork Expo.
Brian Rieck, product manager for Automated Production Systems, shows the company’s Agri-Alert 128 Touch Alarm System. The new one-touch zoom, one-touch filtering alarm system allows producers to check any problem areas at a glance from their computers or smart phones. The alarm system was one of the new swine system products that AP displayed at the 2014 World Pork Expo.
DES MOINES, Iowa — Along with a new disease challenge to the U.S. swine industry came an equal challenge to the swine products industry — design devices and customize existing ones to tackle the spread of the disease.

When it comes to the spread of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, which was first identified in the U.S. herd in April 2013, the challenge has been met in a number of ways.

One of the companies answering that challenge is Illinois-based Automated Production Systems, a part of GSI, which is a global brand of AGCO.

Automated Production Systems is headquartered in Assumption. The company, at the 2014 World Pork Expo in Des Moines, showed off its newest products to help stem the transmission of the virus that causes PED.

“We’ve had a lot of interest in a lot of the products, particularly the ones we’re featuring for biosecurity and also for ventilation and feed systems,” said Brian Rieck, product manager.

One of the stars of the AP show was the Bio-Dri II System for trailer heating and drying.

“It’s a thermal-assisted drying and disinfecting system for trailers. It has high-volume fans that push heated air through a trailer to dry the trailer and disinfect it using high temperatures,” Rieck said.

The system allows for temperatures to be increased or decreased to meet requirements and to reduce cycle time. The system also transmits verification once a drying process has finished and records data related to the process.

The system can be monitored and producers can program parameters into the system from a computer, tablet or smartphone.

One of the major means of transmission of the PED virus, especially in cold weather, was thought to be livestock trailers and one added method of biosecurity that has been emphasized is to thoroughly wash and disinfect trailers, using a high-heat method.

Facility Filters

Another AP system was designed with hog facilities in mind.

“We have a filter system, the Camfil Filtration System, that we consider to be the gold standard of filter systems for the industry. Basically, it protects pigs by letting clean air in and filtering out the different pathogens and viruses. It can be retrofitted to existing facilities or installed in new construction,” Rieck said.

The filters use fine fiber media which can last an average of three to four years. The L9 Pathogen Barrier system has been shown to be effective against medium and larger particle sizes.

A monitoring system, the Agri-Alert 128, is the industry’s first color touch-screen alarm system, Rieck said.

“Basically, there’s one-touch zoom, one-touch filtering so you’ll be able to see any issues or any troubles very quickly. The system also comes with remote access, including text and SMS alerts,” he said.

The touch screen allows all zones being monitored to be seen simultaneously and modular architecture allows producers to customize a system to their individual operations.

Rieck said while interest in all the products designed to reduce the transmission and spread of disease was high, the drying system and the security system had drawn the most attention.

“I would say the greatest amount of interest is about equally split between the Bio Dri and the Agri-Alert systems,” he said.