The Huddleston Farmhouse is the site of the second annual farmers market near Cambridge City, Ind. Farmers and visitors will meet on the lawn each weekend to buy and sell food on land that has been dedicated to agriculture for generations.
The Huddleston Farmhouse is the site of the second annual farmers market near Cambridge City, Ind. Farmers and visitors will meet on the lawn each weekend to buy and sell food on land that has been dedicated to agriculture for generations.

CAMBRIDGE CITY, Ind. — At the intersection of longstanding agricultural heritage and fresh food is the Huddleston Farmhouse, home to the second annual farmers market that will open for the season June 1.

The Huddleston Farmhouse may be new to the farmers market business, but its roots in agricultural reach far back into the early 1800s, when the Huddleston family grew its own food along what now is the National Road Heritage Site.

Today, the historic landmark hosts a farmers market in its lawn on Saturdays from June through September.

“One of the main components of our mission is to reconnect folks with their heritage,” said Joe Frost, community preservation specialist for Indiana Landmarks eastern regional office. “Through this historic site, we are able to do that.”

Frost said that the property makes for a unique farmers market destination.

“I think the biggest difference between here and other farmers markets is that it’s located on a historic site,” he said. “Generally, you see them on a downtown street or in a parking lot. To have a farmers market at a location that was historically a farm is helping with preservation of the property and its heritage in agriculture.”

A variety of fresh foods will be sold throughout the season, including produce, honey and bread. The market also will feature artwork from local crafters.

Those looking for a quiet escape to the country will find just that at Huddleston.

“The atmosphere is very neighborly,” Frost said. “Community members become regulars because they need to stock up on their produce for the week. Last summer, we established a regular following. But it was the first year, so there is room to grow. We’d like to see more vendors and visitors.”

This year, the property will offer a new feature — community garden space.

Indiana Landmarks will rent out plots to those interested in growing their own fruits and vegetables. Frost said that the fee for renting a plot is very low-cost.

“Our goal is to not only create farmers market vendors, but to link the land back to the community and create that space,” he said. “A lot of folks in the area have gardens because it’s rural, but the gardens in their backyard don’t have enough space. Our goal with the farmers market and the community gardens it to tie the site back to the community and make it a usable community space.”

Frost thinks that the experience of seeing food being grown while browsing the market for produce to take home will create a welcoming atmosphere.

The Huddleston Farmhouse will be open for tours during the hours of the farmers market, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., so families can learn about the history of the area.

The road that the house is on frequented was by pioneers heading west to seek new opportunities. The Huddleston family offered a travelers kitchen in the basement, and oftentimes wagons would camp out in the lawn.

Frost said that families who live in nearby cities can easily make a daytrip out to enjoy the market.

“Cambridge City is really growing,” he said. “There’s a number of restaurants and cafes in Cambridge City, as well as nine antique shops. A family could make a day out of coming from Indy or Dayton and visiting the farmers market, the house and spending an afternoon antiquing in town. There’s lots to do.”

Local growers interested in becoming a vendor should contact Frost at jfrost@indianalandmarks.org.