Heather Hill currently serves as the president of Indiana Pork and also helps raise more than 13,000 hogs with her husband and his parents.
Heather Hill currently serves as the president of Indiana Pork and also helps raise more than 13,000 hogs with her husband and his parents.
INDIANAPOLIS — Since she was a little girl, Heather Hill has spent her life around agriculture and pigs, so serving as the president of Indiana Pork seemed like it was destiny.

She was elected as president last February and will hold the position until the group’s annual meeting next year.

“Agriculture was a big part of my life, and pigs were bigger,” she said.

After graduating from Purdue University with a degree in animal sciences, Hill noted, she married her husband, Mark, and through marriage became an official pig farmer.

She and her husband grow corn, soybeans and wheat with his parents, as well as raise about 13,000 hogs for market throughout the year. She also is the manager of the pork account for Pfizer Animal Health.

“I’m surrounded by pigs every which way you look,” she said.

Hill added that the hog industry — and agriculture, in general — is important to her not just from a professional standpoint, but a personal one, as well.

She noted that if her children one day want to have a future in ag, it is necessary that she advocates for it now.

That is why she thought it was a logical decision in 2009 to get involved with the Indiana Pork board.

While serving as president of the organization, Hill does whatever needs to be done and is blessed to have a great staff to help her, she said.

Her responsibilities as leader of the group include presiding over board meetings, helping the board follow its strategic plan and organizing a convention for members.

Part of the plan is not just keeping an eye on pig farmers in the state, but reviewing the amount of pork consumption in Indiana, as well, Hill explained.

At the group’s annual meeting, which is scheduled on Feb. 5 at the Indiana Pork office, elections of new board members will take place, along with an update from the National Pork Producers Council, she said.