Adam Moody, CEO of Moody’s Meats, has opened his fourth butcher shop location. Visitors to the new store at 862 S. Ind. 135, Suite A, in Greenwood, Ind., will find beef, chicken, lamb, eggs, produce and many other goods from local vendors. The business has nearly 50 employees today and has continued to grow for the past 14 years.
Adam Moody, CEO of Moody’s Meats, has opened his fourth butcher shop location. Visitors to the new store at 862 S. Ind. 135, Suite A, in Greenwood, Ind., will find beef, chicken, lamb, eggs, produce and many other goods from local vendors. The business has nearly 50 employees today and has continued to grow for the past 14 years.
GREENWOOD, Ind. — Moody’s Butcher Shop owner Adam Moody is an entrepreneur who has seen his business grow over the past 14 years. What started as a farm has now turned in to four stores and a processing facility.

Although there have been challenges since the first store opened in 2000, Moody has stuck with it, and because of that perseverance, a fourth butcher shop opened in May.

The new location in Greenwood, like his other three stores, features beef, pork, lamb, eggs, chicken, fish, produce and more.

Some of the items in the store are raised on the Moody Family Farm, with meat processed at their family-owned facility. Other items are supplied through local farmers or vendors.

Easter Awakening

Moody, a fourth-generation farmer, went in to the butcher shop business after an Easter holiday in 1997. Moody sold a load of hogs for the market rate of 9 cents a pound.

A little time after that, Moody and his wife, Lucy, went shopping for a ham for Easter dinner and realized they didn’t have enough money to buy a ham.

“That was tough,” he said. “What does it say that the guy who raises the ham couldn’t afford the ham? That got me thinking, I raise hogs, not ham, and that changed my mindset.”

After that they got their meat processed locally and started selling cuts at farmers markets. Moody eventually opened his first butcher shop when the company bought a slaughterhouse in Ladoga.

The first butcher shop was opened in Ladoga in 2000, followed by an Avon store in 2003 and eventually a Zionsville store in 2009.

Moody wants each butcher shop to be a complete store, so visitors also will find produce, eggs, milk, bread, jam and vegetables. A new partnership with Indy Family Farms made it possible to have the vegetables, including greens, zucchini, cucumber, sweet corn, green beans and more, available in the stores.

Sticking with local products is something that was important to Moody.

The general population seems to understand the importance, as well, he said. By using local products, the money stays in the state.

“I’m trying to hook agri and culture back together,” Moody said. “Ground beef doesn’t come on a paper plate at Kroger — it comes from cattle.”

The store is in close distance to other big-box stores, but those stores are challenged to keep up with his business.

“The only thing the bigger stores have on us is convenience,” Moody said.

“We’re asking people to make an extra stop and pay more,” he said. “Eighty to 90 percent will realize cheaper isn’t better. Consumers have to get to a place where cheapest doesn’t equal quality.”

Meeting Challenges

There have been challenges over the years, which is why Moody studies neighborhoods for years before deciding where to place a new store. Moody looked at the Greenwood area for at least two years prior to opening the butcher shop.

A milestone for the young business was that the fourth location was done with outside investment. Getting to that point was a victory for the business.

Moody said he is humbled by the grace he has received from vendors, inspectors, bankers, the weather and many others throughout the process.

Moody’s commitment to his business and local food and farms is what has led him to being such an advocate for Indiana agriculture.

Moody’s expertise is his work on the revitalization of rural areas. The answer to seeing that happen is getting higher yields off farms, he said.

“If you don’t create profit margin, then you don’t get people farming,” he said. “More people have to make profit.”

He learned from his father and grandfather. Growing up in Montgomery County, he can remember the multiple businesses available in the small, but thriving town. In comparison, today there is a bar and a gas station.

Moody got to looking at what has changed to make it that way, and what he found was that the number of farmers has decreased. Because of this, Moody got interested in re-developing rural areas.

“The best way to combat that is to get people to move back to the rural area, but it’s not fair to ask young people to come back,” he said. “Margin is the answer to give people that incentive to come back.”

Spreading The Word

Because of this interest, Moody does work with a lot of agricultural organizations, including Indiana Farm Bureau, Indiana State Department of Agriculture and Indiana Board of Animal Health, as well as in the classroom and at universities.

“If a man does not cultivate the area with which he holds commonplace, it could be said he is a virus,” he said. “I believe we’ve forgotten this.”

On what it feels to have a fourth store open, Moody was modest.

His relationship with God, his wife, Lucy, and their two children and four grandchildren and staying at it in tough times is what has made him sharp, he said.

“It feels good, but in retrospect, I don’t have a big ego about it. There is a lot of responsibility that comes with the business and local food,” he said. “If you would have told me this would happen years ago, I would have said, ‘Who are you talking about?’”

As for the future, Moody said he will see what happens. He will continue to be involved with rural development and agriculture education.

“I enjoy advising, telling the truth and giving people the option to make their own decisions,” he said. “I like to be a purveyor of hope, but I also like to be realistic. It’s hard, but it can be done.”

Find out more about Moody’s Butcher Shop by visiting www.moodymeats.com.